Facebook and Fear

THE SHORT: ‘Why I Keep Fighting

by Chelsea Manning (Medium)

Chelsea Manning, a former Army intelligence analyst, was arrested in 2010 for providing WikiLeaks with a number of classified videos — the most damning of which showed two Army helicopters firing on a group of men that, amongst their numbers, were two Reuters photographers and two children. Widely regarded as the catalyst that put WikiLeaks on the map, Manning is serving out her 35-year sentence at a U.S. Disciplinary Barracks in Fort Leavenworth.

Read The Rest >

THE LONG: ‘Facebook and Fear

by Derek Thompson (The Atlantic)

Facebook recently came under scrutiny for suppressing Republican news headlines in its “Trending” section, something we noted was a possibility in one of our previously recommended articles. In this article, Thompson suggests Facebook shouldn’t be surprised at the forthcoming litigation from Congress, since Facebook’s reach and influence have no historical precedence.

Read The Rest >

Enjoy these articles? Subscribe to our email list for two well-written articles every day — one short (< 5 mins) and one long (10+).

The Waco Siege

‘The coming debt bust’

by The Economist

China’s economy has a grim outlook. Problem loans are inflating, an inflated property bubble is set to burst, and the globe’s second-biggest economy could be in real trouble. The Economist brings clarity to what can be a complicated issue for some, and always does a good job posing solutions to problems it sees.

Read The Rest >

‘Sacred And Profane’

by Malcolm Gladwell (New Yorker)

Gladwell revisits the Waco Siege, a standoff between Branch Davidians, a religious group, and the FBI. Specifically, he revisits how the FBI tried negotiating with the Davidians leader, David Koresh, and how their lack of empathy and understanding caused them to raid the compound, which caught flame, killing 76 people. A must-read, especially in today’s political climate.

Read The Rest >

Enjoy these articles? Subscribe to our email list for two well-written articles every day — one short (< 5 mins) and one long (10+).

Lupita Nyong'o's Choice

Lupita Nyong’o’s Choice

THE SHORT: ‘Why I Chose a “Small Play” Over the Big Screen’

by Lupita Nyong’o (Lenny)

I think as women, as women of color, as black women, too often we hear about what we “need to do.” How we need to behave, what we need to wear, what’s deemed as too much or not enough, the cultural politics of what society considers appropriate for us and for our lives. What I am learning is that the most important questions you can ask yourself are “What do I want?” and “Who do I want to become?”

Read The Rest >

THE LONG: ‘After ‘The Biggest Loser,’ Their Bodies Fought to Regain Weight’

by Gina Kolata (New York Times)

Danny Cahill stood, slightly dazed, in a blizzard of confetti as the audience screamed and his family ran on stage. He had won Season 8 of NBC’s reality television show “The Biggest Loser,” shedding more weight than anyone ever had on the program — an astonishing 239 pounds in seven months.

Read The Rest >

Enjoy these articles? Subscribe to our email list for two well-written articles every day — one short (< 5 mins) and one long (10+).

Erin Schrode, Running For Congress

At just 25-years-old, Schrode is trying to become the youngest woman ever elected to Congress. She is running in California’s District 2, on a platform committed to environmental action, public health, and equal justice. Erin was kind enough to recommend the following articles. Learn more about her campaign by clicking here.

The Short: ‘Scientists Start to Look at Ground Beneath Their Feet for Solution to Climate Change’

by Tim Radford (Ecowatch)

They calculate that although the world’s soils already hold 2.4 trillion tonnes of gases in the form of organic carbon, there’s room for more.

Scientists from the U.S. and Scotland report in Nature journal that with a few changes to agricultural practice, there would be room for another 8 billion tonnes.

Read The Rest >

The Long: ‘In Los Angeles, Ditching the Car for an Eco-Friendly Trip’

by Lucas Peterson (NY Times)

“Los Angeles may feature an abundance of holistic arts, yoga and macrobiotic diets, but it’s probably not the first city that comes to mind when you hear the term ‘eco-friendly.’”

Read The Rest >

Enjoy these articles? Subscribe to our email list for two well-written articles every day — one short (< 5 mins) and one long (10+).

A Day In School With Refugees

The Short: ‘A Day In School With Refugees’

by Sim Mau (Medium)

“Immigrant students are incorporated into classes with Danish students only when they are able to speak Danish. Until then, they are all put together in classes with only immigrants.”

Read The Rest >

The Long: ‘The Broad Strokes’

by Rachel Syme (Grantland)

“Hanging with the highly amusing, deeply stoned, not-so-secretly smart, and super-powerful women of ‘Broad City’”

Read The Rest >

Enjoy these articles? Subscribe to our email list for two well-written articles every day — one short (< 5 mins) and one long (10+).

How Facebook Could Tilt the 2016 Election

How Facebook Could Tilt the 2016 Election

The Short: “Why Quitting Your Job to Chase Your Dream Is a Terrible Idea”

by Jeff Goins (Medium)

Not long ago, my friend Bryan quit his corporate job working as a technical writer for a Fortune 500 company in order to do something new.

On his last day, everyone in the office expressed a mix of envy and surprise. They couldn’t believe he was leaving, that he was making such a big jump. But the truth is Bryan had been planning this moment for 10 years.

Read The Rest >

The Long: “How Facebook Could Tilt the 2016 Election”

by Robinson Meyer (The Atlantic)

At the end of every week, Zuckerberg holds an internal question-and-answer session for employees. Usually before these sessions, the company circulates a poll internally asking what concerns he should address. On March 4, as one of these polls circulated among workers, many employees voted to ask him: “What responsibility does Facebook have to help prevent President Trump in 2017?”

Read The Rest >

Enjoy these articles? Subscribe to our email list for two well-written articles every day — one short (< 5 mins) and one long (10+).

Don’t read more. Read better. Sign up here.

Sean Parker takes on cancer

THE SHORT: “$250 million, 300 scientists and 40 labs: Sean Parker’s revolutionary project to ‘solve’ cancer”

by Ariana Eunjung Cha (The Washington Post)

Billionaire Sean Parker, famous for his founding roles at Napster and Facebook, is backing an unconventional $250 million effort to attack cancer that involves persuading hundreds of the country’s top scientists — who often are in competition with each other — to join forces and unify their research targets.

Read The Rest >

THE LONG: “Inside the Nondescript Building Where Trillions Trade Each Day”

by Matthew Leising and Annie Massa (Bloomberg)

The 49 different exchanges that lease space at this data center sent a record 9.6 million messages per second through its fiber-optic cables in February. Every day, electronic trades representing trillions of dollars’ worth of equities, derivatives, currencies, and fixed-income assets pass under this roof. This is NY4. This is where Wall Street actually transacts.

Read The Rest >

Who runs the world? Facebook

THE SHORT: “System Overload”

by James Surowiecki (The New Yorker)

From the crumbling bridges of California to the overflowing sewage drains of Houston and the rusting railroad tracks in the Northeast Corridor, decaying infrastructure is all around us, and the consequences are so familiar that we barely notice them — like urban traffic congestion, slow-moving trains, and flights that are often disrupted, thanks to an outdated air-traffic-control system. The costs are significant, once you reckon wasted time, lost productivity, poor public-health outcomes, and increased carbon emissions.

Read The Rest >

THE LONG: “How Will Zuckerberg Rule the World? By Giving Facebook’s Tech Away”

by Cade Metz (Wired)

That’s right, Facebook has designed a 360-degree video camera, and it’s giving the designs away. The plan is part of Zuckerberg’s sweeping effort to move the Internet beyond text and photos and video to a new mode of communication.

Read The Rest >

Enjoy these articles? Subscribe to our email list for two well-written articles every day — one short (< 5 mins) and one long (10+).

Don’t read more. Read better. Sign up here.

Steph Curry, Ballet Artist?

“The Future of Design Is Emotional”

by Daniel Eckler (Medium)

In 1950, the American psychologist Harry Harlow conducted an experiment that separated infant monkeys from their mothers just a few hours after birth. Each monkey was isolated in a cage and given two dummy mothers. One mother was constructed of metal wire and held a milk bottle; another was covered in synthetic fur and designed to resemble a real monkey, but it provided no sustenance.

Read The Rest >

“The Artistry of Stephen Curry”

by Scott Cacciola (NY Times)

Taras Domitro was not a basketball fan when he joined the San Francisco Ballet as a principal dancer in 2008.

“But I became one,” he said.

Read The Rest >

Enjoy these articles? Subscribe to our email list for two well-written articles every day — one short (< 5 mins) and one long (10+).

Don’t read more. Read better. Sign up here.

Value in humanities

THE SHORT: “Lessons from the humanities and social sciences”

by Mary Sue Coleman and John L. Hennessy (Washington Post)

We — one of us a biochemist who leads a large, public university in the Midwest; the other a computer scientist who leads a private university in Silicon Valley — believe deeply that our country’s scientific and technological capacity is critical to its economic future.

But we also have cause for concern.

Read The Rest >

THE LONG: “The Assad Files”

by Ben Taub (The New Yorker)

Capturing the top-secret documents that tie the Syrian regime to mass torture and killings.

Read The Rest >

Enjoy these articles? Subscribe to our email list for two well-written articles every day — one short (< 5 mins) and one long (10+).

Don’t read more. Read better. Sign up here.